Plants that Take the Heat and Fill Your Summer Garden with Color

Blue plumbago - pale blue flowers against a dark green background of leaves

One of the major goals of gardening in Texas is finding colorful, high-performing plants that add drama to our summer landscapes and hold up to Texas heat. “Fortunately, there are many to choose from, including both perennials and annuals and both native and adapted plants,” says Sr. Horticulturist Steve Huddleston. “In fact, you might find you have more options that you realized.”

Look to Native Plants for a Drought-Tolerant, Ecosystem-Friendly Garden

Purple flowers cover the branch of a redbud tree

As FWBG | BRIT celebrates National Native Plant Month this April, we invite you to bring more Texas natives into your garden. “Gardening with native plants is an easy way to support local wildlife, cut water consumption and reduce your reliance on pesticides,” says Sr. Horticulturist Steve Huddleston. “And I think you’ll find the results can be beautiful.”

Promoting Beneficial Insects in Your Garden

Red ladybug on a green blade of grass

Insects and gardeners: it’s a long relationship, and all too often, it’s needlessly antagonistic. Very few insects are actually the enemy. Successful gardeners should learn the difference between good insects and pests, as well as how to encourage the beneficial bugs and sustainably manage the harmful ones.

Look to Winter-Blooming Shrubs to Bring Color to Your January Garden

Japanese Quince

Many people regard winter as a bleak and barren time in the garden. Deciduous trees have lost their leaves, perennials have died back and the garden has entered its period of rest. Such a setting, however, provides the perfect foil for the “gems of winter”—those shrubs that put forth their blossoms in January and February and enliven the winter landscape with beauty.

Start the New Year with Plants Grown from Seed, Save Money

Seedlings

It’s true that in a few months you’ll be able to walk into a garden center or home improvement store and find row upon row of vegetables ready for you to transplant into your garden. But there’s a certain magic to growing plants from seed, not to mention opportunities to save money and grow exactly what you want.

For Brilliant Spring Color, Plant Your Bulbs Now

White and yellow daffodil close up

December is bulb-planting month in the Garden. This year, nearly 150,000 bulbs, including tulips, daffodils and hyacinths, are being planted by grounds staff and volunteers. “It’s a lot of work to plant this many bulbs, but the results will be stunning in March and early April,” says Sr. Horticulturist Steve Huddleston. Home gardeners should also get their bulbs in the ground this month for the best results come spring. Learn more about the best bulbs for north central Texas to get started.