Category: Newsletter

A hand pours tea from a Japanese teapot into small bowls
Engage

Restored Tea House Welcomes Guests to Experience the Way of Tea

Guests to the Spring Japanese Festival will have an opportunity to view the Japanese Garden’s Tea House, now open after a comprehensive restoration. Japanese garden expert John Powell drew on the Urasenke tradition, a centuries-old school of tea that emphasizes harmony, respect, purity and tranquility, to guide the restoration. “The Way of Tea is much more than a traditional way of serving guests a drink,” says Powell. “It is a rich tradition of hospitality that invites hosts and guests to respect one another and the world around them.”

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Yoga class outdoors
Learn

Stretch Your Body and Relax Your Mind with Yoga in the Garden

Exercise can sometimes feel like a chore. You know it’s good for you, and you’re always glad you’ve done it, but it can seem like yet another obligation. But what if exercising wasn’t a burden but rather a treat? That’s what yoga in the Garden offers, says yoga instructor Edwina Taylor. “The Garden is so peaceful and invigorating. You feel the breeze and the warmth of the sun. And it’s so relaxing to be outside moving and breathing.”

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Purple flowers cover the branch of a redbud tree
Garden

Look to Native Plants for a Drought-Tolerant, Ecosystem-Friendly Garden

As FWBG | BRIT celebrates National Native Plant Month this April, we invite you to bring more Texas natives into your garden. “Gardening with native plants is an easy way to support local wildlife, cut water consumption and reduce your reliance on pesticides,” says Sr. Horticulturist Steve Huddleston. “And I think you’ll find the results can be beautiful.”

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Field of deep blue bluebonnets against a green field
Newsletter

Protect Native Plants to Protect the Planet

April is National Native Plant month and a great opportunity to talk about the importance of native plants to the health of our planet. Native plants help preserve local wildlife, reduce water use and protect and restore soil, but these plants are threatened by invasive species, habitat loss and water quality issues. What is FWBG | BRIT doing to protect these plants? And how can you help?

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Prickly pear cactus fruits
Learn

Experience Food in a New Way While Foraging Texas

Today we have a pretty clear idea where our food comes from: the grocery store. Of course, we know that food is actually grown and raised on farms, but most Americans today have spent little to no time at a farm or ranch. True, some keep a garden, raise backyard chickens or hunt, but for the majority of us, food comes from the store and is wrapped in plastic. Author Eric Knight would like to change that. He encourages Texans to get outside and find their food by foraging for the edible plants. Knight will introduce foraging with a book talk and signing on March 26 at the Garden.

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Child's hands hold a ladybug
Newsletter

Better Know Your Bugs with These Fun Family Activities

Kids love bugs! Whether creeping, crawling, fluttering or flying, insects are fascinating—and they’re a great opportunity to learn about the natural world as a family. ith Butterflies in the Garden on-going and David Rogers’ Big Bugs opening this month, now is a great time to interest your family in insects with some great books and easy home activities.

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Two pale butterflies gather nectar from yellow flowers
Newsletter

Which Came First, the Butterfly or the Flower? The Answer: Both!

If you’ve ever taken a high school biology course, you may have learned that pollinators such as butterflies and bees evolved alongside flowers for their mutual benefit. The result of generations upon generations of plants and pollinators evolving side by side are what botanists have called “pollination syndromes.” These are fascinating systems that have much to teach us about the natural world—but recent research reveals they may not be as simple as botanists once thought.

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Red ladybug on a green blade of grass
Garden

Promoting Beneficial Insects in Your Garden

Insects and gardeners: it’s a long relationship, and all too often, it’s needlessly antagonistic. Very few insects are actually the enemy. Successful gardeners should learn the difference between good insects and pests, as well as how to encourage the beneficial bugs and sustainably manage the harmful ones.

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