TODAY'S HOURS: 8 AM – 6 PM

*Last entry is an hour before closing

TODAY'S HOURS: 8 AM – 6 PM

*Last entry is an hour before closing

Tales from the Conservation Trenches : Saving the Small-headed Pipewort

Eriocaulon koernickianum or small-heded pipewort. Photo by Don Hunter

A well-known issue in global conservation efforts could be described as the Panda Problem. Programs that promote the protection of large, well-known mammals raise more funds than programs for smaller, less “charismatic” species. Yet even the smallest, nondescript species are part of the big picture of life on this planet–and deserve protection.

Why All the Latin? Taxonomy, Binomial Nomenclature and Carl Linnaeus

When you visit the Fort Worth Botanic Garden, you will notice signs identifying the plants. In the Japanese Garden, for example, you will see signs that read “Acer palmatum (Japanese maple).” Many people know that the part of the name in italics is the formal name of the plant, written in Latin (more or less.) Some people might even know that Acer palmatum is the genus and species of the tree more commonly known as Japanese maple. But why? What is the purpose of giving plants names in a dead language?

The Botany of Bluebonnets, Texas’s Favorite Flower

Row of bright blue and white bluebonnets

The bluebonnets are in bloom across North Texas, splashing waves of blue across hillsides and plains. Conditions this year were just right for brilliant display of color, and you can expect to see families plunking their kids down in the middle of blooming patches for photos all weekend.

PRESCRIBED BURN PLANNED FOR BRIT PRAIRIE

In conjunction with the Fort Worth Nature Center & Refuge, Fort Worth Botanic Garden is hosting an Urban Prescribed Burn Workshop tomorrow Friday March 3. This professional education event will involve a live controlled wildland burn activity on the Botanical Research Institute of Texas prairie at the corner of University and Trail Drive at 2 p.m.

Art and Science Meet in New Exhibition “Illuminations”

The worlds of art and science interact in fascinating ways in a new exhibit opening Feb. 17 at the BRIT Building. “Dornith Doherty: Illuminations: Past, Present, and Future of Fern Research” presents new large-scale artworks that engage with the past, chronicle the present and project our possible ecological futures.

Dornith Doherty Art Exhibition Opens Feb. 17  

The Fort Worth Botanic Garden is pleased to present “Dornith Doherty: Illuminations: Past, Present, and Future of Fern Research,” an art exhibition free and open to the public from Feb. 17 through Jun. 30 at the Madeline R. Samples Exhibit Hall in the BRIT building at 1700 University Dr. Fort Worth, Texas 76107. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday. For more information, please call (817) 332-4441.