Kids fingerpaint together

Help Your Young Scientists Learn and Grow at S.E.E.D Camps

The days are getting longer, the temperature is getting warmer, and summer is right around the corner. Give your kids the gift of an outdoor adventure by enrolling them in our S.E.E.D. (Summer Exploration, Engagement and Discovery) camps.

“S.E.E.D. camps are a great opportunity for kids to explore the natural world,” says Anna SoRelle, innovative learning manager for special programs. “We have a line-up of camps planned that will get children from ages 4 to 14 outside and hands-on as they build their E-STEM knowledge and skills.”

Camps are divided into programs suitable for different ages. Here’s a rundown:

Ages 4 – 5

June 6 – 10, 9 am – 12 pm – Bugs Among Us: Bees, butterflies, wiggling worms, and more!

June 13 – 17, 9 am – 12 pm – Water World: Water, water, everywhere!

June 27 – July 1, 9 am – 12 pm – Water World: Water, water, everywhere!

July 11 – July 15, 9 am – 12 pm – Bugs Among Us: Bees, butterflies, wiggling worms, and more!

Ages 6 – 7

June 6 – 10, 9 am – 3 pm – Texas Native Treasures: Investigate the flora and fauna of our own back yard. This camp is sold out.

July 11 – 15, 9 am – 3 pm – Texas Native Treasures: Investigate the flora and fauna of our own back yard.

Ages 8 – 11

June 13 – 17, 9 am – 3 pm – Gardeneering: See the garden from a new perspective—through a STEM lens.

June 27 – July 1, 9 am – 3 pm – Gardeneering: See the garden from a new perspective—through a STEM lens.

Ages 12 – 14

June 21 – 22, 9 am – 3 pm – Nature Tech: Technology isn’t just for indoors anymore.

June 23 – 24, 9 am – 3 pm – Nature Journaling: The garden gives us food for our mind, body, and soul.

Registration is filling up, so sign up today for an unforgettable summer experience.

Related Articles

Goache painting of a Lemon by Olivia Garcia-Hassell
Learn

Explore Gouache for a More Creative New Year

Artistic creation can lighten your spirit and restore your soul. It’s easy to forget this truth in the hustle and bustle of every day life, but it’s worth remembering and exploring. If you’re looking to be a more centered, whole and creative person in 2023, consider trying Creative Art with Olivia.

Read More »
Orange blooms on a begonia against dark green leaves
Garden

Begonias Brighten January Days with Winter Blooms and Amazing Variety

Midwinter is a quiet time outside in the Garden, with most plants dormant until the days grow longer. But in the greenhouses devoted to the Garden’s Begonia Collection, excitement is growing as these remarkable plants get ready to bloom. Learn more about the incredible variety of begonias and get started growing your own.

Read More »
Dog Days
Engage

Dog Days Returns in 2023 for More Tail Wags and Nose Boops

Dog Days was introduced in 2022 and has been a howling success for canine fur babies and their human companions. This year, the Garden is expanding the program to one weekend a month, allowing pooches and their favorite people more opportunities to frolic on the grounds.

Read More »
Newsletter

Herbarium Reaches Transcription Milestone with 52,000-plus Specimens Fully Digitized

The herbarium is the heart of research at the Garden. A major priority of the herbarium is to digitize the collection by photographing the specimens and transcribing the related information recorded by botanists. Staff and volunteers made significant strides in reaching this goal last year. “The herbarium ended 2022 with complete transcriptions of 52,674 specimens,” says Herbarium Collections Manager Ashley Bordelon.

Read More »
Newsletter

FWBG Experts and Volunteers Digitize Records of Renowned Botanist in Cutting-Edge Project

Botanist Sherwin Carlquist (1930-2021) was a legend in his field, a prolific researcher who made major contributions to plant systematics, plant anatomy, island biology and wood anatomy. He traveled the world collecting plant specimens, photographing plants in the field and collecting data about ecosystems. Hard work by our experts and volunteers means scientists interested in studying Carlquist’s work will soon have a new type of digital resource giving them unprecedented context for his findings: an extended specimen network. Assuming, that is, that they can decipher Carlquist’s handwriting. 

Read More »